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response to movie
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gem2005



Joined: 21 Jan 2006
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2006 8:12 pm    Post subject: response to movie Reply with quote

I had to watch the movie on this site as part of a college assignment. Obviously we have been studying reconstruction. The blatent and horrifying racism only became real to me after watching it and seeing the passive looks on the faces of those men and women who killed a fellow human being.
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Mika



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 4:23 pm    Post subject: Watching the movie Reply with quote

The movie was remarkably moving. I was merely surfing the web when I happened upon the site. James Allen's works sincerely reflects his compassion for humanity. One can hear it in his voice as well as his thought provoking words.

I have long been aware of the devastation this 'great country' has bestowed upon its weak. Weak meaning, less fortunate, disenfranchised, etc.

I'm grateful to have bared witness to this great work and would love to be notified of any and all updates.
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Kara Jo Fagan



Joined: 24 Jan 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 12:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I watched this movie for a class I am in. Had I not been in this class I wouldn't have come here and done this. Why, you may ask, because I like the narrator am afraid of what I will find when I search. He wrote about people tearing pages out of their family albums and how he had made a new family album. This was incredibly moving to me. The other most influential portion of the movie was the words written on the postcard. The person writing it was sending it because he was in it and proud of the picture. This part made me nearly vomit. It spoke volumes to me that the entire message of the postcard was trumped due to some jerk who was excited about having his picture taken. Not that the real message of the postcard was good, this just really brought it home to me. This movie was disturbing but necessary for my understanding of the tragic situation that took place right here not to long ago. Am I glad I was assigned this movie and response, yes, because it forced me to look at the real picture.
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Jessica Krueger



Joined: 24 Jan 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 3:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was assigned to watch the movie for a course that I am taking. I knew that the movie was about lynchings so I tried to prepare myself for what I was about to watch. It was difficult to prepare myself for something that I deem to be a horrible part of American history. To see the looks of pride on the murders faces was sickening to me. The fact that they took enough time to make these photos into postcards and put their names on them (the postcards) was amazing to me. How much hatred does it take to murder someone for the color of their skin? I also found myself thinking about the families of the people that were lynched. I tried to imagine how they would feel if their families saw these postcards. Seeing a video like this makes the situation much more real to me. Reading words in a book is one thing, but to see photos is that much more powerful and real.
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Athletics



Joined: 24 Jan 2006
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 5:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had to watch this for a class I am taking now. But I thought this video showed how blacks were treated if they made any little mistake. A mistake little as whistling at a lady when she walked by could get someone lynched. It was hard to watch but it showed what really happened back then in the south. The postcards that were made were just horrible anyone shown on a postcard being hung is just plain wrong.
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CaliMarie



Joined: 24 Jan 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 11:52 pm    Post subject: response to movie Reply with quote

I too am responding to this movie for a class I'm taking. I was disturbed by the photographs and especially by the passive looks on all the faces of the people watching. The pictures reflect all aspects of the time period and how blacks literally meant nothing to the whites. Lynching was the white's way of keeping the power, and keeping the black population economically, socially, and politically lower than them. The realism of this time period finally hit me when I was watching the video. It's easy to talk about lynching and violence in the South, but it's hard to really grasp the reality of it until watching this video.
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Eric G



Joined: 25 Jan 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 4:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am also in the class that is posting responses and feel the same sentiments as my classmates. Like others have said, the most disturbing part to me is the faces of the people that have taken part in the lynching or are right beneath the African American who was just lynched. The look of nothingness and almost a delight is frightening and very sad. I can't reason with anyone who blames it on "the times" because it should not matter when or where this took place, but it is a terrible crime and absolutely horrifying to look at. We have learned that white people thought of black people as an inferior race and really dehumanized them. This short video puts race issues of the 19th and 20th century in a completely new perspective and it seems to be that white people are threatened by this race they call "inferior." The most disturbing photo, to me, was the woman who was lynched from the bridge. Not only was it terrible to look at, but terrible on the photographers part to get such a good angle and take so much time to get a good picture.
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mher



Joined: 25 Jan 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I also had to watch this movie for a class assignment, and now since I have watched it, have a whole new perspective. I was not prepared for this viewing at all which has made an impact on myself which I will never forget. One thing that sticks out to me about the movie was the willingness of the people to be in these horrible pictures. It seemed to me that everyone around wanted to be in the pictures as a sort of celebration. This really disturbed me because it shows just how cruel people can truly be. I also was surprised at how many lynching pictures they could find. I had learned about lynchings before, but I didn't know how common they were until this brief movie. I never would have been on this site if it weren't assigned, but now that I have experienced it, I can truly say that this experience has opened my eyes.
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gem2005



Joined: 21 Jan 2006
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 8:47 pm    Post subject: class assignment Reply with quote

As I was reading all the class responses to the topic, which largely express shock at the faces of the white men in the pictures, I was wondering what these people thought 30 years after the photo was taken. I realise the people in these pictures aren't alive now, but I wonder if they ever regretted what they did or saw the postcards as we see them now?

Since reading the assigned readings for this week and especially after seeing the movie on this site, the horror of the post reconstruction south really has been impressed upon me. Apart from the postcard pictures, I was particuarly struck by the document entitled "by a Georgia negro Peon". It was so sad to see that after he had been legally freed he was actually still kept in the same kind of slavery he had been used to all his life. The fact that he married and still his wife was taken to live with another man was so sad. Often you hear that things slightly improved for ex-slaves after they were freed because they could live with their family. This, however, illustrated that often even this was deprived them.
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tglaser4



Joined: 26 Jan 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2006 12:35 am    Post subject: A. American History 309 Reply with quote

After watching this horrible movie I serioulsy could not believe what I had just seen. It made me feel sick to my stomach at first. I really cannot belive that white people treated our same species like that, it is unbelievable to me. The thing that really was disturbing to me the most was the number of people that were at the lynchings just standing there waching a human being hanged like a rag doll. In a few of the pictures i noticed that it looked like some of the limbs may have been torn off as they were being hanged. Being hanged is bad enough but ripping off limbs is just uncalled for. I also noticed that i saw some children standing there witnessing the lynchings. I would think that this sort of thing would be extremely traumatizing for a young child, it is not right at all.
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IntelligenceSeeker8



Joined: 28 Sep 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2006 7:40 pm    Post subject: Quite Enlightening.... Reply with quote

I have just finished watching the movie; I haven't looked at anything else on this site. My Human Rights Literature instructor told us about the site and told us to look at it because it relates to the course, specifically a book titled Billy and a video we saw about Emmitt Till.
I have seen images such as these in a course I took about two semesters, but seeing them in a movie, makes it just as impactful, if not more so, as seeing them the first time. Also the narration gives a different, but just as moving perspective about the action. To hear him describe his emotions in response to these post cards, make the "story" more authentic[/color]
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ashiko



Joined: 28 Sep 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2006 10:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I always thought "but I didn't do those things", yet I saw faces in the crowd that looked like "my people".

As a white person, I am ashamed.

I live my life trying to make up for these atrocities by bringing to other whites an awareness and teaching the need for accountability for who we were and are today.
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rayne



Joined: 30 Sep 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2006 5:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This video was both shocking and informative. I think it is important not to sweep these things under the rug. But to acknowlege them, learn from them and move on with a renewed sprit for the rights of all human beings. Because this sorts of thing (since less killings) is still going on somewhere in the world whether it be Africa, Iraq, or the U.S.
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Observer_15



Joined: 12 Oct 2006
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I completely agree with ashiko and the rest of you. Our American Cultures teacher showed us this video. We were learning about the KKK and he said he had wanted to show us this before but he didn't get the chance. (He had taken a short vacation.) Throughout the entire viewing of the movie everyone was completely silent. And as the movie came to and end and our teacher turned off the projector it still remained completely quiet. I almost smiled because we our usually a routy and talkative class and never before had we remained silent unless told several times to do so by a teacher. He had asked what our thoughts were on the movie and, even though I thought it basically explained itself, some still answered. I wanted to respond to it here to show my feelings for the troubles of our past and how gruesome they were. I almost couldn't look at the picture of the man in (I think it was) the electric chair. Another picture that disturbed me greatly was the picture of the girl hanging from the bridge, as Eric G stated, and all the whites standing above her. It is disgusting to think that these people were not bothered by their vicious crimes.
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DivaWriter



Joined: 14 Oct 2006
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2006 5:50 am    Post subject: Heartened by your responses! Reply with quote

[quote="ashiko"]I always thought "but I didn't do those things", yet I saw faces in the crowd that looked like "my people".

As a white person, I am ashamed.

I live my life trying to make up for these atrocities by bringing to other whites an awareness and teaching the need for accountability for who we were and are today.[/quote]

Please know that as a bi-racial woman of color, I am heartened by many of the responses to these ghastly pictures of our countries past. To the young people (students) and others like Ashiko, I believe that there is hope for the future as long as there are kind and good people like you.
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